OBJECT STEALING

OBJECT STEALING

Usually seen in high-energy dogs and very social dogs/breeds. Boredom, attention-seeking, loneliness and excess energy are mostly to blame. Helping your dog to break the habit will require a different approach, depending on what their reason for the behaviour is, and also depending on how long the habit has taken to develop. Helpful suggestions: Regular, fun exercise – be it daily play in the garden or walks. Aim to provide sufficient exercise, quality time and mental stimulation on an ongoing basis. Take your dog’s age, breed and fitness level into consideration. Provide daily treat dispensers (DIY: Google) and chew toys

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English Bulldog

Once used in the horrific practice of bear baiting but now much loved, the English bulldog is a sweet, dependable, often stubborn breed. It’s laid back energy level and enjoyment of napping makes this dog a popular family pet choice. The breed will actively solicit human attention and generally gets along well with other pets, but can be aggressive to unfamiliar dogs. It’s generally apprehensive of visitors and so make good watch dogs. Exercise needs are around 20 – 30 minutes a day. They enjoy unhurried walks at a cooler time of day. The breed’s tendency to: bark is low,

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Why having pets sterilised is so important..

Article by Dr Sheilagh Hahn in the journal for SABCAP (SA board for Companion Animal Professionals). A cat that has had 4 kittens (which is a small litter), may have 2 daughters in that litter. If those 2 females had 4 kittens each a few months later, we’d have 4 females plus the original mother having more kittens in this time. If you continue to do the maths at a doubled up ratio every six months (again, this is conservative), and include the kittens that the male cats from these litters are fathering, after 4 years you’ll be nearing the

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Boerboel

This breed is intelligent, observant, loyal, courageous, protective and energetic. The Boerboel was bred to guard the homestead and family within, and to tackle large animals like lions and baboons. They’re therefor very protective of family and territory, always wanting to be with their owners and involved in family life. This dog will not hesitate to defend a family member to the death. It is not unusual for the breed to display aggression toward other dogs or strangers so early and ongoing socialisation is necessary. The Boerboel needs firm handling and good leadership skills from an early age. Obedience training

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Gluten-free dog biscuits

As people are opting for fewer refined grain product, a lot are switching their dogs to a gluten-free diet too. Here’s a yummy recipe for your dog’s favourite treats. Ingredients 2 cups fine almond flour ½  cup coconut flour 2 tablespoons ground flax seed ½ cup peanut butter ½ cup water Method Preheat oven to 160ºC Line a baking sheet with parchment paper Combine flours & flaxseeds Add peanut butter & water. Mix together Kneed mixture until it forms a dough ball Roll out to approximately 1cm thick. Use a biscuit cutter to stamp out biscuits or cut into squares

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Bull Terrier

The brave and bouncy Bully was originally bred in Europe for human “entertainment” by way of dog-fighting and bull-baiting as well as for vermin control. By mixing the English Bulldog for its tenacity and the old English terrier for its speed, the Bull terrier was born. Then because 20% of pure white Bull terriers were being born deaf, some colour was introduced by further breeding with the Staffordshire Bull terrier to lower probability of deafness.  This mix is the Bully we know today. The breed is known to be loyal and protective of their human family and because of their

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Understanding pack structure

Wild dogs long ago adopted a hierarchical order that establishes which members get first option on food, the best resting spots and the healthiest mates. So rather than having to fight for access to valued things every time, those lower down in rank know to wait their turn. That way they not only keep order within the pack, but also keep the pack strong because the best genetics are bred with, while the weaker animals’ offspring may not be as healthy and die earlier. In our domesticated dogs, the more senior pack members will sometimes show a bit of aggression

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Basset hound

The Basset was bred for pack hunting because of its good sense of smell. At home the breed needs a fairly firm and patient owner. Training can be challenging as the Basset can be a stubborn dog. Toilet training is also sometime quite a job with the breed. It doesn’t have high energy needs, but requires space and regular unhurried walks. The breed also enjoys playing so its a good idea to introduce a play routine early on. The Basset is sometimes difficult to let off-leash during walks because of its strong scenting ability, which can override the need to

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Developmental stages in dogs

Eyes open                                                        10 – 14 days                   (gentle introduction to handling) First set of teeth, start walking                                    2 – 3 weeks                     (supply appropriate rubber chews, safety) Ears open                                                         3 weeks                              (continue careful socialisation) Controlled excretion – no reflex stimulation            1 month                              (start house training) Eyes start to focus                                            6 weeks                              (more socialisation – add variety) Weaning                                                           7 weeks                              (soft solid food) Pack formation begins                                              2 months     

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The “guilty” look

Do we get it right – trying to communicate information to our pets? Why then do their “bad” behaviours continue? Naturally we view everything from our human perspective. We judge situations by our own experiences, by our needs and by our norms, so misunderstandings with our pets can happen easily. Confusion and stress can result, which often worsens the problem. That ‘guilty look’ – the low posture and looking down as you raise your voice and wave your finger at your dog isn’t guilt at all. Its “I see you’re angry about something. I’m sorry you feel that way. Please

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