Bull Terrier

Bull Terrier

The brave and bouncy Bully was originally bred in Europe for human “entertainment” by way of dog-fighting and bull-baiting as well as for vermin control. By mixing the English Bulldog for its tenacity and the old English terrier for its speed, the Bull terrier was born. Then because 20% of pure white Bull terriers were being born deaf, some colour was introduced by further breeding with the Staffordshire Bull terrier to lower probability of deafness.  This mix is the Bully we know today. The breed is known to be loyal and protective of their human family and because of their

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Understanding pack structure

Wild dogs long ago adopted a hierarchical order that establishes which members get first option on food, the best resting spots and the healthiest mates. So rather than having to fight for access to valued things every time, those lower down in rank know to wait their turn. That way they not only keep order within the pack, but also keep the pack strong because the best genetics are bred with, while the weaker animals’ offspring may not be as healthy and die earlier. In our domesticated dogs, the more senior pack members will sometimes show a bit of aggression

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Basset hound

The Basset was bred for pack hunting because of its good sense of smell. At home the breed needs a fairly firm and patient owner. Training can be challenging as the Basset can be a stubborn dog. Toilet training is also sometime quite a job with the breed. It doesn’t have high energy needs, but requires space and regular unhurried walks. The breed also enjoys playing so its a good idea to introduce a play routine early on. The Basset is sometimes difficult to let off-leash during walks because of its strong scenting ability, which can override the need to

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Developmental stages in dogs

Eyes open                                                        10 – 14 days                   (gentle introduction to handling) First set of teeth, start walking                                    2 – 3 weeks                     (supply appropriate rubber chews, safety) Ears open                                                         3 weeks                              (continue careful socialisation) Controlled excretion – no reflex stimulation            1 month                              (start house training) Eyes start to focus                                            6 weeks                              (more socialisation – add variety) Weaning                                                           7 weeks                              (soft solid food) Pack formation begins                                              2 months     

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The “guilty” look

Do we get it right – trying to communicate information to our pets? Why then do their “bad” behaviours continue? Naturally we view everything from our human perspective. We judge situations by our own experiences, by our needs and by our norms, so misunderstandings with our pets can happen easily. Confusion and stress can result, which often worsens the problem. That ‘guilty look’ – the low posture and looking down as you raise your voice and wave your finger at your dog isn’t guilt at all. Its “I see you’re angry about something. I’m sorry you feel that way. Please

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Great Dane

This elegant gentle giant was originally bred for hunting and to guard property. The breed is generally affectionate and greatly enjoys family life. Danes are not very active but need lots of space because of their size, as well as unhurried, regular walks. These dogs should never be exercised on a full stomach as they can develop painful and even dangerous intestinal torsion. Their tendency to dig and bark are low making them a relatively popular breed to welcome to the family, provided there’s enough space. In training these dogs can be stubborn and might need an extra treat or

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What’s in a name..

Try not to use your dog’s name in negative ways too often, even if you are a bit angry. If that happens once too many times your dog may not be that keen to listen to you the next time. They may be scared of the consequences. If you use their name mostly in positive ways, such as during play and praise, which time should always be made for, the sound of it is more likely to get your dog’s positive attention and interest in the future. You’ll be training your dog and yourself!

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Pomeranian

Also known as the Toy pom this is one of the miniature spitz dog breeds. The Pomeranian has high energy levels and requires at least 20 minutes of exercise daily. Daily play times at home, out on the lawn are also valued by this little dog. The breed’s tendency to dig and chew are low but its tendency to bark is quite high, so during boredom, stress or loneliness your Pomeranian is most likely to bark as an outlet. The Toy pom is alert, perky, social, intelligent and independent. This little dog will sometimes approach far larger dogs without concern,

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A combined sense of taste and smell, for much better results!

While we humans have about 9000 taste buds dogs have only around 1700, but when it comes to smelling ability dogs win hands down. They have around 125 million sensory glands in their nasal areas versus our meager 7 million. The vomero nasal organ (or Jacobson’s organ) in roof of their mouths allows for further “smelling” ability as it is enables your pooch to “taste” not just a meal’s freshness, but also helps them to interpret their environment in ways we’re only beginning to understand. The next time you take your best friend for a stroll, take notice of what

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RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK

The noble Rhodesian Ridgeback was originally bred to hunt lion and as a guarding to homesteads. It is dignified, quiet, gentle, tolerant, intelligent, family orientated and a good watch dog. The breed has moderate social needs. It is content around its own family members, but naturally wary of strangers. Early and ongoing socialisation is very helpful in helping to avoid wariness developing into aggression. Can be aggressive towards other dogs and non-family pets. It’s an active breed, needing at least 40 minutes of exercise a day, preferably outside of the garden to incorporate necessary socialisation. This dog is ideal for

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